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BONUS 1

Craving Control: How Taste Makes Us Overeat

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About this report

This 44-page Science Report contains links to extra reading materials and scientific references.

Imagine the following scenario…

You’ve just finished eating a tasty cinnamon muffin, but the other two muffins in the pack are winking at you.

You can’t shake the thought of how fluffy, nutty, and gorgeous they taste. You want another one!

Hormones and gut-brain signals tell you when you’ve had enough.

But cravings are much more unpredictable, and even irrational.

Cravings are partly explained by the feeling of pleasure that your brain derives from eating calorie-laden food treats.

Their effects on our brain reward centres can even be compared to those of a recreational drug.

So when you gorge on high-calorie foods, like that tasty cinnamon muffin, you activate the reward system in your brain… and it feels good!

This is hedonics.

But, is hedonics (pleasure) the same for all of us?

Or do some people get more pleasure out of eating food than others?

If food-pleasure sensations vary from person to person, could this be contributing to gluttony, overeating, and our ever-expanding waistlines?

In this report, you’ll find out whether taste perception, taste sensitivity, and the pleasure of eating – all of which impact which foods we choose to eat – have a strong association with eating behaviour and body weight.

You’ll also learn which factors influence how much pleasure you get from your food. It’s a fascinating topic!

Topics covered in this report:

  1. Behind your food desires
  2. Hedonic eating
  3. Craving control
  4. Better at detecting salt and sugar
  5. Figure 1: From tasting to overeating
  6. Born to taste differently
  7. Your unique taste-detection threshold
  8. Figure 2: Taste-detection threshold
  9. Does threshold influence body weight?
  10. Intensity and obesity: is there a link?
  11. Figure 3: Sugar and taste intensity
  12. Manipulating taste-detection thresholds
  13. Is it the same for the overweight?
  14. Do non-tasters eat more calories?
  15. Rewarding your voracious brain
  16. Feeling hungry = food enjoyment?
  17. Not hungry, but feel like indulging
  18. Beyond hunger: the reward response
  19. Give yourself a pat on the brain
  20. Dopamine receptors gone rogue
  21. Figure 4: Craving switch
  22. Can food make you euphoric?
  23. “I could use some chocolate cake”
  24. Food as self-medication
  25. Eating all our problems away
  26. Figure 5: Irrational drive to eat
  27. Plus 100 more reasons!
  28. Your key takeaways
  29. Learn more
  30. References and resources

When you eat high-calorie foods, you feel a sense of satisfaction. But do some people get more pleasure from eating than others? Could this cause overeating and weight gain?

BONUS 2

Full Yet Hungry. Appetite Neurochemistry (Part 1)

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About this report

This 26-page Science Report contains links to extra reading materials and scientific references.

People tell you “when you feel full, stop eating”.

But what does feeling full mean anyway?

And why do we keep eating despite having a filled up, stretched stomach?

It appears that the science of feeling full is not as straightforward…

In this report, we start unravelling some of its mysteries.

Topics covered in this report:

  1. Full yet hungry?
  2. There is “full” and “full”
  3. Fat, leptin and hunger
  4. More than a “satiety hormone”
  5. Graph: Your leptin levels
  6. The body as a machine
  7. The psychology of eating
  8. Hunger and reward
  9. Can leptin lower food reward?
  10. Dopamine and reward
  11. Stimulating one type of neurons
  12. Genetics, laser and neurons
  13. How to ask a mouse
  14. The brain likes dopamine
  15. Sugar is rewarding when hungry
  16. Leptin decreases sugar reward
  17. Leptin and obesity
  18. Your key takeaways
  19. Learn more
  20. References and resources

People tell you "when you feel full, stop eating". But what does feeling full mean anyway? And why do we keep eating despite having a filled up stomach? The science of feeling full is not as straightforward… Begin learning about your “hungry brain”.

BONUS 3

Full Yet Hungry. Appetite Neurochemistry (Part 2)

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About this report

This 41-page Science Report contains links to extra reading materials and scientific references.

Have you ever wondered why we keep feeling hungry despite being full?

And how is it possible to have a starving brain… in an overweight body?

What weird biochemistry could be causing us to overeat?

If your satiety signal is broken, can it be restored?

In this Part 2, we dive deeper into the mysteries of our appetite neurochemistry to find the answers!

Topics covered in this report:

  1. Unanswered questions
  2. Satiety and brain reward
  3. Food deprivation and body fat
  4. Our obesogenic environment
  5. Your hypothalamus and appetite
  6. Leptin signalling
  7. Your ARC and appetite regulation
  8. Other signals to the brain
  9. Anorexigenic vs orexigenic
  10. Figure 1: Brain Regulation of Energy Intake and Usage
  11. Things don’t add up
  12. Wishnofsky’s rule
  13. The two phases of weight loss
  14. When your ARC detects less leptin
  15. Figure 2: Compensatory Eating
  16. The “set point” theory
  17. Your body weight “thermostat”
  18. Can I change my set point?
  19. The leptin gene
  20. An anti-obesity treatment?
  21. Leptin resistance and overeating
  22. Full stomach, starved brain…
  23. A brain that doesn’t see leptin
  24. Can I restore my leptin sensitivity?
  25. Your key takeaways
  26. Learn more
  27. References and resources

Have you ever wondered why we keep feeling hungry despite being physically full? What makes us overeat? And if your satiety signal is broken, can it be restored? We dive into the mysteries of our appetite neurochemistry to find the answers!

BONUS 4

Does Night Eating Make You Gain Weight?

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About this report

This 72-page Science Report contains links to extra reading materials and scientific references.

“Never eat after 6:00pm!” “Don’t snack after dinner!”

Many people think eating at night makes you gain weight.

But does it really make a difference whether you eat your spaghetti bolognaise at 5:00pm or at 10:00pm?

Is it better to eat a big breakfast than a big evening meal?

How could eating at night cause weight gain? Have scientists thoroughly investigated this?

And, if night eating does lead to weight gain, is there anything you can do to avoid or minimise it?

We’re going to examine 4 theories as to why night eating might cause weight gain, by explaining their principles and seeing whether they have been proven or disproven in scientific studies.

Then, we’ll pull together what we’ve learned from each of these theories into some practical tips for you!

This is one of our most comprehensive reports, where we put science to the test, to find out whether eating late really does cause weight gain (or not!).

Topics covered in this report:

  1. Do you get the munchies at night?
  2. “In theory…”
  3. Theory 1: Night eating and weight gain
    • Where should we start?
    • Keeping tabs
    • “You’ve already finished eating?!”
    • Weekends: where it all goes wrong?
    • Theory 1: Satiety signalling
    • Eating speed and satiety
    • “I’m still feeling peckish”
    • The Achilles heel of Theory 1
    • Is evening snacking the issue?
  4. Theory 2: Night eating and weight gain
    • There’s more to satiety than the gut
    • Figure 1: Satiety hormone leptin
    • Weight: a ticking time bomb?
    • The rhythm of life
    • Figure 2: A master clock’s symphony
    • Against the clock
    • Ramadan’s night eaters
    • Night eating, leptin, and weight
    • Later leptin
    • Figure 3: Appetite during Ramadan
    • Madar’s mission
    • Insulin and leptin
    • Theory 2: Shifting hormone rhythms
    • Carb-loading at dinner time
    • Late eaters vs early eaters
    • If not leptin, what else?
    • Ramadan: not just a fast, but a feast
  5. Theory 3: Night eating and weight gain
    • Synchronised clocks
    • Why keep to time?
    • Other zeitgebers
    • Fighting for survival
    • Figure 4: 24-hour food metabolism
    • Follow the light, or follow the food?
    • Theory 3: Clocks in conflict
    • Adapting to a new eating window
    • Predictability matters
    • Skipping daytime meals
    • Figure 5: Food, your new zeitgeber
    • The search must go on
  6. Theory 4: Night eating and weight gain
    • TEF 101
    • Do you burn less calories at night?
    • Lower TEF, more weight?
    • Another nocturnal TEF study
    • Figure 6: Morning vs evening TEF
    • 2,700 reasons not to eat?
    • Dinner: to skip or not to skip
    • In science, context matters!
  7. Let’s wrap up
  8. Table: Preventing Weight Gain
  9. Your key takeaways
  10. Learn more
  11. References and resources

Many people think eating at night makes you gain weight. But does it really make a difference whether you eat your spaghetti bolognaise at 5:00pm or at 10:00pm? With so much hearsay out there, it’s time to settle this debate once and for all. In this 72-page report, we put science to the test and examine 4 theories to find out if eating late really does cause weight gain (or not!).

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    A.When you enrol, you get access to the entire Advanced Clinical Weight Loss Practitioner course, its 70 units, all 58 client templates, plus coaching scripts and session handouts. Once enrolled, you can start, pause or finish your course at your own pace. You’re 100% in control. But hurry, if you’d like to ALSO receive all the premium bonuses listed above, you need to enrol now before they expire!

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    A.Once you join the course, the entire BONUS Pack will be added to your account right away. It’s that simple! But you must hurry and enrol now before your BONUS Pack goes away.

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    A.Of course! We will answer any other question you may have. And fast. Feel free to drop us a line here.

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Research shows that over 50% of us want to lose weight. But the problem is that conventional weight-loss strategies often fail, because they don’t account for the intersecting factors that are unique in each of us.

Alex, our Research Director, often says: “If you’re doing everything right and not getting results, then you’re not doing everything right for you. The goal is to work with, not against, your body.”

The complexity of the human brain and body means that individualised plans call for scientific knowledge and detective work. Each of us has a unique biochemistry: our own metabolism, hormones, genetics, microbiome, appetite neurobiology, body composition, nutrient needs, intolerances, food addictions, and eating psychology – all of which are essential to weight loss success. Lifestyle factors like food access, eating habits, sleep patterns, environmental toxins, athleticism or lack of motivation to move, financial pressure, worry and psychological stress can all interact with those variables. Individualised plans pose a greater challenge.

All this requires scientific knowledge and an in-depth understanding of someone’s unique biological, psychological and lifestyle factors, and how those influence and play off each other.

A diet that helps one person thrive can set another person back, so it’s crucial to educate yourself and study the science behind the top variables that influence someone’s ability to lose weight and maintain it.

That’s why students of our Advanced Clinical Weight Loss Practitioner course get 58 client assessment tools and worksheets, across 70 course units, to evaluate what works and what doesn’t for each person.

Our advanced course goes above and beyond pretty much anything we have seen in this space. It’s jam-packed with the latest science, worksheets and planning tools to help you successfully build a personalised weight loss program.

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