Are Your Genes, Gut Microbiome and Weight Connected?


by Alejandra "Alex" Ruani — Get free science updates here.

Can a lack of gut bacteria make you overweight? But what shapes the bacterial colonies that live in your gut?

Is it the foods you eat? Or could it be your genetic makeup?

More importantly, can you manipulate your gut microbiome to protect yourself against obesity?

In this report, we look at how our genes and our gut microbiome may influence our weight, and whether there’s anything we can do about it – or not.

Grab “Are your genes, gut microbiome and weight connected?” below:

 

Download PDF NOW!

 

Conveniently download this 30-page science report. Contains links to extra reading materials and scientific references.

Topics covered in this report:

  1. What’s the gut microbiome?
  2. Your gut microbiome and disease
  3. The scope of this report
  4. Can our genes influence our gut microbiome?
  5. Genetically inheritable microbes
  6. Inheritable microbes and weight
  7. Genes for Christensenellaceae
  8. Christensenellaceae implants
  9. Genes impact microbiome and weight (graphical abstract)
  10. What is metabolic syndrome?
  11. Inflammation and gut microbiome
  12. TLR5 receptors and obesity
  13. Can you influence your gut microbiota?
  14. Butyric acid and friendly bacteria
  15. Just Granny Smith apples?
  16. Probiotics and obesity
  17. Probiotics and appetite hormones
  18. NAPEs, satiety and body fat
  19. Propionate and hunger regulation
  20. So, what have we learned?
  21. Your key takeaways
  22. References and resources

 

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The-Health-Sciences-Academy-Alejandra-Ruani-small1-right
Alex Ruani leads the research division at The Health Sciences Academy, where she and her team make sense of complex scientific literature and translate it into easy-to-understand practical concepts for students. She is a Harvard-trained scientific researcher who specialises in cravings and appetite neurobiology, nutrition biochemistry, and nutrigenomics. Besides investigating and teaching the latest advances in health and nutrition science, Alex makes it easier to be smarter with her free Science Catch-ups every other Thursday.
Connect with Alex via email.


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20 Comments

  • Joe-aan

    Reply Reply February 26, 2015

    Hi Alex a very interesting read. It explains about different family traits and how some can eat everything and others very little, a new perspective on size and diet issues. Thank you

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 26, 2015

      Joe-aan – glad you enjoyed it! And a point to remember is that we’re not entirely doomed by our genes, there are things we can do to alter phenotypes :-)

  • Laura

    Reply Reply February 26, 2015

    When I thought I knew all there is to know about weight, hunger and fat storage, i was proven wrong!! These studies are just a couple of months old and so interesting, i am checking out the resources too. Thanks a lot for the terrific science, this report is a gem!!

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 26, 2015

      Laura – you’re so welcome! Scientists make new discoveries every day, so stay tuned for more :-)

  • Monika

    Reply Reply February 26, 2015

    This was a very interesting and surprising read, thank you for sharing.

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 26, 2015

      Monika – we love surprising you with our research!

  • Jacqueline Pinto

    Reply Reply February 26, 2015

    I read the information and I was aware of apples helping but not aware it was basically granny smith that did the trick over other apples. In my long battle with Candida I have discovered that my mother had a severe case of the same disease and that I contracted it from her. Lying for a long time in the birth canal I contracted the disease and have been fighting this since I finally figured it out when I was in my forties. I should explain that Candida is too much bad bacteria in the intestine. I now take about four probiotic supplements a day and that seems to help the situation greatly. Now that I know about the granny smith apples I will add that to my diet. Thanks!

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 26, 2015

      Jacqueline – thanks for sharing and I love to hear that you’re walking away with an action step to implement! :-)

  • pam sandberg

    Reply Reply February 26, 2015

    I’ll be eating a lot more Granny Smith apples, for sure. Thank you for up-to-date, clear and interesting info.

    Pam

  • John

    Reply Reply February 26, 2015

    Excellent stuff. Your up-to-the minute research is impressive, today I received a press release for the Ruth Ley study but you described it before the scientists did!! with the added value that more studies are explained and everything is put into context. In my opinion you are the best source of info I’ve seen on the internet, keep up the great work!

  • Katerina

    Reply Reply February 27, 2015

    new studies talking about emulsifiers provoking irritation, inflammation of intestine membrane
    http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/common-food-additive-promotes-inflammatory-bowel-disease-and-obesity-mice

    • Maria (Research Analyst)

      Reply Reply February 27, 2015

      Katerina – thanks, it’s by the same scientists we mention in our science report: Chassaing, Goodrich, Ley, and Gewirtz :-)

  • Belinda

    Reply Reply February 27, 2015

    another really useful and interesting article. I too will be buying Granny Smiths from now on!!!
    its great to be able to add another useful strategy to my tool box in the battle against obesity, so thank you.

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 27, 2015

      Belinda – love to hear you’ll be helping others with your learnings!

  • Susanne

    Reply Reply February 27, 2015

    Hi Alex,

    That’s a fascinating report. I didn’t know about the granny smith apples though and will start eating them again. Had swapped them for other Braeburns. What puzzles me though is that while this research must be in the public domain, the Health Service is still not ‘prescribing’ diets that could prevent the most common diseases. We should go back to the original Chinese philosophy, where doctors were paid to prevent you from getting ill rather than for curing symptoms of diseases. But then the pharma industry really wouldn’t be to keen on that concept. That’s a fascinating article and just goes to show that good old home cooked / prepared food is still the best. I mostly avoid any prepared foods also because of the high sugar and salt levels and in reality, they are just dead stuff that goes straight through your gut without delivering much in terms of nutrients.

    Best wishes and looking forward to more interesting stuff!

  • Vincent

    Reply Reply March 1, 2015

    so we are eating dead stuff / so we are paying dead stuff food ! and we hope to stay alive don t we ? sorry to say that but we are likely on the way of a kind of under development … with regard food nutrition , …

    this article at least gives some hope that some people still doing a great job to help others …! thank you !

    • pam sandberg

      Reply Reply March 3, 2015

      Not sure what you are trying to say here, Vincent. “paying dead stuff food…”???

  • Vincent

    Reply Reply March 3, 2015

    Dead stuff food : am just trying to say : empty food , food with no nutrients … , I should have said may be “dead stuff “only, since I don t know if we can still call what we eat sometimes food ? … (Hence am wondering if a poison can be considered somehow as a proper food ? if not then food with poisons … .should nt be called food …) I appreciate your question ! thank you !

  • Elizabeth

    Reply Reply October 1, 2016

    Dear Alex I am absolutely bowled over at the information you are providing and I am about to download. Really expressed and looking forward to sharing with my family and friends.

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