Can Alkaline pH Diets Prevent Bone Loss?


by Alejandra "Alex" Ruani — Get free science updates here.

We often hear about acidic or alkaline foods or substances, but what do these terms actually mean? And how are they related to pH?

More importantly, do alkaline diets hold up to the claim that they prevent bone loss?

In this report, we present the scientific evidence so that you’ll know exactly what to answer when someone asks you about this topic!

Grab “Can alkaline pH diets prevent bone loss?” below:

 

Download PDF NOW!

 

Conveniently download this 30-page science report. Contains links to extra reading materials and scientific references.

Topics covered in this report:

  1. What are alkaline pH diets?
  2. What’s pH?
  3. What are hydrogen ions, and where do they come from?
  4. Diverse body tissue, diverse pH
  5. Intestinal pH
  6. What if our blood gets too acidic?
  7. Effects of metabolic acidosis
  8. Do alkaline diets prevent bone loss?
  9. Are bone-loss prevention and blood pH connected?
  10. How is blood pH regulated?
  11. Bicarbonate and acidosis
  12. pH regulation by your lungs
  13. Blood pH, kidneys and lungs
  14. What causes metabolic acidosis?
  15. Other causes of metabolic acidosis
  16. Back to the alkaline diet hypothesis
  17. Acidic diet and calcium in urine
  18. Protein and calcium absorption
  19. Your key takeaways
  20. References and resources

 

Download PDF NOW!

 

If you want to get the latest science and our tips, make sure you sign up to our Thursday emails HERE.

And let me know in the comments below what you think about alkaline diets and bone health - I'd love to hear from you!

The-Health-Sciences-Academy-Alejandra-Ruani-small1-right
Alex Ruani leads the research division at The Health Sciences Academy, where she and her team make sense of complex scientific literature and translate it into easy-to-understand practical concepts for students. She is a Harvard-trained scientific researcher who specialises in cravings and appetite neurobiology, nutrition biochemistry, and nutrigenomics. Besides investigating and teaching the latest advances in health and nutrition science, Alex makes it easier to be smarter with her free Science Catch-ups every other Thursday.
Connect with Alex via email.


Every other Thursday we share our research and actionable advice to help you and those you care about. If you enjoyed this, join our FREE updates.

19 Comments

  • Eli

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    As a chemistry teacher, I can see how well explained this is, about something I always wondered myself! In vivo vs in vitro always tend to differ…. THanks for another wonderful lesson!!

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 5, 2015

      Eli – glad we could help! Diving into the biochemistry is necessary in debates like this one :-)

  • Sam

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    What an interesting reading! I’ve always been suspicious of the claims made by alkaline diet fans and this confirms I wasn’t far off. One thing I had no idea about was that fasting and low-carb dieting can cause metabolic acidosis, that’s a shocker! Does Atkins cause it too?? Thank you!!

    • Sophie (Research Analyst)

      Reply Reply February 5, 2015

      Hi Sam,

      Yes, the Atkins diet can cause metabolic acidosis because it causes ketones to be produced, which are acids. It is essentially the same physiological response as starvation because in both scenarios there is insufficient carbohydrate for energy production so fat stores have to be oxidised for energy as a last resort for brain function.

      I hope this answers your question.

      Sophie (Research Analyst)

      • Sam

        Reply Reply February 5, 2015

        Incredible, that answers my question Sophie! I’ve learnt a lot today, each THursday something new and amazing……… thanks a bunch!

  • Tom

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    Alex: This is prob the best review i’ve seen debunking the alkaline fad, the detail is excellent! BTW i’ve never heard of metabolic acidosis before, that section was an eye opener…

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 5, 2015

      Tom – we love eye-openers and debunking myths!

  • Zoe

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    My health coach friends swear by the alkaline diet but I guess it’s not all as rosy as they paint it so will definitely share this with them. I personally think that defending a diet theory without fully understanding how the body works is wrong, though I think they’ll get emotional about it when I show them this. I’m cautious about diet fads, that’s why I love your reports and the science stuff, thanks a lot !!!

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 5, 2015

      Zoe – you’re so welcome, and yes, it’s important to keep an open mind when the scientific evidence proves us wrong, it happens all the time :-)

  • Bianca

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    Alex, these pdfs are wonderful! You not only explain these complex aspects in such an easy and ordered way, they are all backed upi with scientific evidence and logical explanation – which is what counts and make them only worthy and true. I am always looking forward to your new uploads. Thank you for this excellent research! Best wishes Bianca

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 5, 2015

      Bianca – your feedback means the world to us! We work hard to make sure your time spent with us is stimulating and valuable :-)

      • Bianca

        Reply Reply February 5, 2015

        And this time you spend is paid back million times…. with valuable and thruthful knowledge
        More needs to be done to disseminate the truth. Unfortunately this is very difficult due to the widespread sources out there (such as authoritynutrition) that claim to be evidence-based and still provide faulty information or just one side of the story and fail to debate correctly, just leading to more confusion and misconceptions in the public. What a pity. Keep doing great research! Thanks for the great stimulation! Bianca

  • Kathy

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    Very interesting! I have been diagnosed with osteoporosis and I also suffer with kidneys stones, so learning more about this subject is very helpful to me personally, as well as useful for work with clients. The alkalizing diet is a good one because it emphasizes raw green vegetables, something everyone needs more of. Desperate to find a solution to my problems, I went on this type of diet and actually both of those problems got worse, not better! I now know that, although eating lots of vegetables is a good thing for my body and has many benefits, reducing kidney stones and hastening the regeneration of bone are not helped particularily by this type of diet. I hope an another report you’ll explain exactly what can be done for bone formation and to reverse bone loss and the prevention of kidney stones. I’ve begun to taking more magnesium, vitamins D, E, A and K, which seems to be helping with the kidney stones, at any rate. If you know of any studies that show what foods and supplements help with these problems, please let us know. Thank you!

  • Suzan

    Reply Reply February 5, 2015

    When I first saw the title I believed I had missed something with an alkaline diet because I always knew it was nothing to do with bones. I follow the Budwig diet and know how important it is for me to consume the correct amount of fat and protein even though some of it is acidic. Thanks so much for your easy to understand format and confirmation that this diet continues to work for me today.

  • Myrna

    Reply Reply February 7, 2015

    Hi Alex
    Thanks for the explanation,it is Super interesting the way you back it up with scientific evidence.

    Myrna

  • Claudia

    Reply Reply February 8, 2015

    Hi Alex

    This was very interesting as always. Something I have been trying to get my head around for a while, which fits in with this weeks topic, is phytic acid specifically. This is used a lot in the paleo dieting world, where the argument is that phytic acid prevents the absorption of key nutrients because phytic acid binds nutrients that are then excreted rather than absorbed. Phytic acid appears to be in grains, legumes, and nuts amongst others, which paleo dieters avoid altogether. My research hasn’t really clarified how founded these claims are, so if at any point you could write about that or know of a good review I could consult I’d be forever grateful because I just get increasingly confused.

    All the best

    • Alex

      Reply Reply February 8, 2015

      Claudia – what a great suggestion for a future report! Most reviews out there tend to be one-sided, take things out of content, or miss important angles, leaving the reader even more confused :-)

  • HIren

    Reply Reply February 12, 2015

    Hi Alex, I am a new reader. I really enjoy reading these reports, they are well laid out making them easy to read and you get straight to the point. Thank you very much and I look forward to reading more of them.

    Hiren

Leave A Response

Please enter a valid number to confirm that you are human. *

* Denotes Required Field