What Kind of Nutrition Professional are You?

Nutrition professional considering options

Have you ever sat down and thought about what kind of nutrition professional you are, or want to be?

We have seen and worked with thousands of graduates, and came up with a professional yet fun set of traits.

The list we came up with has 11 different types of nutrition professionals, based on a combination of personality traits, professional experience, and other factors!

Take a moment to consider your own personal behaviours, preferences, and quirks…

And think about ways that these things influence your professional choices.

Which category of nutrition professional do you feel most identified with?

Or which one do you WANT to be identified with?

Ready? Let’s go!

The Generalist

Pros:

You’re a jack-of-all-trades and manage to come up with ways to serve a variety of different types of clients. You love to study, but don’t spend too much time on any one topic.

You’re always willing to learn, and even if you don’t have the answer ready, you’re prepared to steer your clients in the right direction!

Cons:

Sometimes your attention is scattered, and it can be difficult to really niche down to attract the types of clients you want.

How to improve:

Take a step back and prioritise your business goals again. Create a simple persona of the ideal type of client you’d like to serve and decide what you’ll need to learn to do this the best.

Then, you can focus on evolving into the nutrition professional they need you to be and start growing an amazing client list!

The Crusader

Pros:

You have a passion for sharing knowledge that’s almost unparalleled in the field of nutrition! You want to shout your new discoveries from the rooftops, and often use social media, personal testimonies, and professional channels to do so.

As a crusader, you are on a mission to wipe out bad nutritional advice, and you’re always looking for new opportunities to gain ground.

Cons:

It can be easy to go too far and to come on too strong. Some clients might worry that you’re imposing your own beliefs onto them.

How to improve:

Work on communicating and delivering information in a way that’s personalised to each of your clients.

Personalise your message and delivery. You can achieve the same goals – clients appreciate scientifically-backed nutritional advice.

The Militant 

Pros:

You are the very definition of “self-control” and rarely miss a workout or indulge in unhealthy behaviours. Your militant stance fosters accountability and pushes your clients to work harder towards their goals!

Cons:

Not every client will respond well to your strict approach, and some clients may push back even harder.

How to improve:

It’s important not to scare your clients off with routines that are too strict.

Consider providing small rewards for any progress your client is making, to avoid creating a “pass/fail” atmosphere.

There are many ways in which you can improve your client communication skills, and our Nutrition Business Advisors can help you with that.

The Influencer

Pros:

You have the power to affect change! People watch and respect what you do. You’re not afraid to set the bar high, and lead by example.

There’s a good chance that you have a lot of charisma and know-how to inspire those around you!

Cons:

Sometimes the spotlight can be a bit much, and that can result in too much pressure on you to feel perfect. This in turn can lead to stress or even cause a rift in client relationships.

How to improve:

Don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone and to humanise yourself in the eyes of those around you.

You could for instance do a candid live social media video, and use that time to create a more personal connection with your clients.

Also, consider branching into other nutrition areas to reach a larger demographic. Because if you have the power, use it!

The Groupie

Pros:

You’re always up for learning from those who you respect and admire. Maybe you’ve already taken on some clients of your own, but you still love to work with a mentor or another professional to expand your knowledge.

Cons:

It’s easy to feel safe with someone else at the wheel (and this is okay for many)! But you may miss out on new and interesting opportunities to grow yourself and your business if you don’t learn to take risks.

How to improve:

Sit down and develop an action plan. Come up with ways that you can become more confident in your abilities and consider expanding your certifications to increase your know-how and become the expert yourself!

The Debunker

Pros:

You’re going to take on the world, one nutrition myth at a time! You might have taken to social media, public forums, and even conferences to try and shed light on the bad nutritional info that seems to keep circulating like a bad penny.

The pursuit of truth is noble, and you’ve got it down to a science!

Cons:

The pursuit of truth can also be exhausting, and there’s definitely more bad information out there than good.

You’re also finding that it can be disheartening and discouraging to constantly debunk every piece of bad advice out there. People can be mean, and it leaves a mark.

How to improve:

Stop fighting petty battles on social media. If someone thinks they are better than you, they will do everything to bring you down. It’s not worth your time.

Instead, focus on your clients and start spreading the truth through that way. Maybe even ask your clients to tell their friends and family (it might even end up in referrals).

The Science Bomber

Pros:

You’re educated, know how to do your homework, and can teach clients all about the ins and outs of nutrition as it interacts with their bodies.

This type of high-level knowledge gives you an edge and adds to your professional credibility.

Cons:

It’s one thing to know the science, and a whole other thing to know how to apply it!

Sometimes, you have trouble translating what you know into actionable information for your own clients.

How to improve:

Consider going back through your certification course materials to refresh your approach to client interactions. The Downloadable Client Materials will certainly help with that.

Also remember that you can have all the scientific knowledge but if you don’t put it into practice, it’s not making any difference.

So make sure to always have actions, plans and personalsed advise that your clients can use. This is what they are paying you for.

The Gourmet

Pros:

You don’t just love food…

You’re a pro at presenting it in a way that’s palatable, beautiful, AND appealing to just about everyone.

This can be great fun when working with clients and gives you a way to really show off your gourmet skills.

Cons:

Your skills can also make you something of a food elitist at times and can intimidate clients.

How to improve:

Take a step back and look at each meal you prepare from the perspective of someone who could “burn water.”

Consider simplifying food choices, introducing client favourite ingredients, and toning down your menu to make it a bit more accessible.

Not everyone will share your love of food. Unless you plan on becoming (or already are) a professional chef, remember to tailor meal plans for your clients, instead of the other way around!

The Behaviouralist

Pros:

You have the psychological skills of a Criminal Minds episode and know how to fight off your client’s setbacks before they even have the chance to share them.

Not only are you efficient, you understand the behaviours that lead to bad nutritional habits and know-how to help your clients overcome years of bad conditioning.

Cons:

It’s easy to get so caught up in the behaviours surrounding nutritional choices, that you lose touch with your clients on a more personal level. You may also neglect environmental reasons for their issues because you become so focused on the internal ones.

How to improve:

It’s essential that you have a balance in your practice and so it’s worth paying extra attention to both internal and external nutritional factors.

This way, you know when to refer clients to a medical professional, and when to step in and offer advice that will address their concerns.

It’s a good idea to consider adding a certification to your line up in this instance!

The Specialist

Pros:

You’re a laser-focused professional with an eye for your area of expertise.

You may have spent years carefully studying one area of nutrition, and you’ve become so good, that you can cite scientific studies and evidence by heart.

Cons:

This laser-focus could turn into tunnel vision that creates a client niche so narrow that it becomes nearly non-existent.

How to improve:

DIVERSIFY! We know that it can be tempting to fall into one area that interests you…

But even tentatively branching out into another area of study can diversify your client base quickly. It may benefit you to obtain additional certifications.

Or, if you’re “married” to one area of expertise, consider investing in a client getting bundle to help you better target your niche.

The Multi-Specialist

Pros:

The Oxford Dictionary defines this as “a specialist in many subjects.”

You may be an expert in many areas (different from a generalist who knows a little about a lot), and you’ll have the best chance of helping the largest group of clients.

THIS is the type of nutrition professional most of our graduates aspire to be!

No matter what your goals are, becoming a multi-specialist can help you achieve them and have a real and lasting impact on the world.

Cons:

Not many…

How to improve:

Just keep on being amazing!

The real power behind the multi-specialist is the drive to learn more and constantly expand their areas of expertise. And introduce new client services and solutions.

And it all starts with a commitment to lifelong learning and a true passion for helping others.

No matter which of these categories feels like you, it’s never too late to start evolving as a professional!

Are you ready to invest in yourself? Click here to start your premium nutrition education and begin your professional evolution today!